hi:

sorry I wasn’t ignoring you I was just watching 7 seasons and 32 episodes of this new show I found

(via -everdeen)

Ugh I’m really hating on orcas right now. Fucking mean they’re mean they are.

why did i let myself watch a video about orcas attacking cute seals and dolphins? they play with their food and it’s so cruel and i know its the circle of life but gosh now i’m going to bed all sad.

i hope that this job gets easier. from what i hear, a lot of people started out not enjoying work but then time and practice made it more enjoyable/bearable. i don’t want to quit on something like starbucks and i definitely don’t want to be fired so i really hope that the shifts i take the rest of this summer are enough to get me comfortable working as a barista. i don’t want to feel the stress of like, not liking my job and dreading coming to work during the actual quarter when i’ll have more stuff on my mind.

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.
You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.
This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.
Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.
Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.
Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.
It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.
If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue. 
Sign the petition, then spread the word.

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.

You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.

This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.

Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.

Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.

Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.

It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.

If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue.

Sign the petition, then spread the word.

(via fishingboatproceeds)

Why is this only on my dashboard the day after my failed attempt at recreating the colors of the wind?

(via maisiewilliams)

I’m really liking how I can ignore my lab projects until the day before they’re due and still manage to finish hem without too much stressing on my part.

(via always-tete)

With riots raging in Ferguson, Missouri following the shooting death by police of an unarmed African-American youth, the nation has turned its eyes toward police brutality, social injustice, and the continuing crisis of race relations throughout the U.S. Here are The Onion’s tips for being an unarmed black teen in America:

Shy away from dangerous, heavily policed areas.

Avoid swaggering or any other confident behavior that suggests you are not completely subjugated.

Be sure not to pick up any object that could be perceived by a police officer as a firearm, such as a cell phone, a food item, or nothing.

Explain in clear and logical terms that you do not enjoy being shot, and would prefer that it not happen.

Don’t let society stereotype you as a petty criminal. Remember that you can be seen as so much more, from an armed robbery suspect, to a rape suspect, to a murder suspect.

Try to see it from a police officer’s point of view: You may be unarmed, but you’re also black.

Avoid wearing clothing associated with the gang lifestyle, such as shirts and pants.

Revel in the fact that by simply existing, you exert a threatening presence over the nation’s police force.

Be as polite and straightforward as possible when police officers are kicking the shit out of you.

burritno:

spongebob hitting people where it hurts

burritno:

spongebob hitting people where it hurts

(via perrbearr)

When The Media Treats White Suspects And Killers Better Than Black Victicms.

curvesincolor:

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via The Huffington Post.

(via always-tete)

But let’s get something straight: a community pushing back against a murderous police force that is terrorizing them is not a “riot”. It’s an uprising. It’s a rebellion. It’s a community saying We can’t take this anymore. We won’t take it. It’s people who have been dehumanized to the point of rightful rage. And it happens all over the world. Uprisings and rebellions are necessary and inevitable, locally and globally. This is not to say that actual riots don’t happen. White folks riot at sporting events, for example. Riots happen. But people rising up in righteous anger and rage in the face of oppression should not be dismissed as simply a “riot”.

Don’t be distracted by terms like “rioting”. Whether you’re for or against uprising and rebellion (side-eye if you’re against it, though), it’s a tool, not the issue itself. The issue is yet another Black teenager murdered by police. His name was Mike Brown.